Remembrance Day in Harmondsworth

Residents from the Heathrow villages came into Harmondsworth to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War 1 with a special event following a church service in St Mary’s Church.

 Roy Barwick outside the church gates with their poppies of remembrance

Roy Barwick outside the church gates with their poppies of remembrance

The contribution and sacrifice made by the village of Harmondsworth in WW1 was outstanding. Virtually all the young men between 18 and 35 served in the armed forces. Of these, almost a quarter never returned. Ninety-two men were killed and many of those who survived were seriously injured. Their names are to be found on the war memorial in the back of the Church.

Roy Barwick, whose family have lived in the village for generations, organised an commemoration event in September and reminded residents that many of the people living in the village have a family connection to these men.

Photos of event: Alan Boyd

 The rain clouds cleared and the sun came out on the poppies

The rain clouds cleared and the sun came out on the poppies

 Residents organise the outdoor section of the village commemoration

Residents organise the outdoor section of the village commemoration

 The Venerable Amatu Christian-Iwuagwu of St Mary’s Church addresses the crowd

The Venerable Amatu Christian-Iwuagwu of St Mary’s Church addresses the crowd

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 Residents had organised a stage and a public address system for the event

Residents had organised a stage and a public address system for the event

 As the sun lit the stage it was standing room only on the village green

As the sun lit the stage it was standing room only on the village green

 Jane Taylor, Chair of Harmondsworth and Sipson Residents’ Association reads a poem

Jane Taylor, Chair of Harmondsworth and Sipson Residents’ Association reads a poem

 A performance by children from Harmondsworth Primary School

A performance by children from Harmondsworth Primary School

 Roy Barwick

Roy Barwick

 Performance by two sisters who live in the village.

Performance by two sisters who live in the village.

 One hundred crosses were planted on the village green in remembrance

One hundred crosses were planted on the village green in remembrance

For the Fallen

by Laurence Binyon


With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres,
There is music in the midst of desolation
And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted;
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years contemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;
They sit no more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They sleep beyond England's foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,

Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,
Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain;
As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,

To the end, to the end, they remain.


Source: The London Times (1914)









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